Why ‘Biracials’ Are Not the Enemy

Paula Patton, actressI was inspired to start this blog by a malicious and completely inaccurate comment from a ‘hater’ on another blog. This person, who was female (or posing as one) claimed that “biracials” were, for all intents and purposes, the enemy of Black people in America, because they had “no allegiance to their ancestors and people”. Apparently, this person believes that “biracials” should only acknowledge the “ancestors and people” that are of African descent and pretend that the rest do not exist.

She also stated that anyone who was capable of loving someone not of their ethnicity / culture MUST hate themselves, and this made her “sad”. Lol.

My perception of this person (and the many others like her) was that she saw “African American culture” as nothing more than a group of people who have varying degrees of African ancestry giving one another the paper sack test. And if you cannot pass, you are (in their eyes) the enemy. You are the ‘other’. You are to be hated and feared.

This thought process is not only non-productive to the interests of African-Americans, but creates an atmosphere of degradation and criminality for the sake of acceptance by the ABCs (Acting Black Crew).

I’ve known more than a few “biracials” who were willing to do drugs, drop out of school, commit crimes guaranteed to land them in prison, have illegitimate children with worthless sperm donors whose only desirable attribute was very dark skin, etcetera and so forth, just to prove that “they were down”, or at least not “tryin’ ta be better than a n*gga”. Smh.

The “biracials” who do reject the idea of being “Black” or “African American” (based on those I know) are actually rejecting the idea that they have to live in a certain neighborhood, eat certain foods, pretend to to be ignorant of just about everything useful, give up higher education, wear their hair a certain way, give their children pseudo-African names, speak Ebonics, and pretend that their non-Black family members do not exist. In other words, they refuse to pay the cost of admission that the ABCs seem to feel they are due. Thankfully, not all African Americans feel the need to live their lives the ABC way.

I have always rejected the idea of a circumscribed ABC life, where I must lower my standards to zero and pretend to be someone I’m not. That is not how my parents raised me. BUT I still consider myself to be African American / Black American / “Black” (whichever you prefer), despite my abhorrence at what now passes for “African American culture”.

All of the African Americans that I associate with as an adult feel the same way. Even those who were raised by ABC parents have grown up to reject the life destroying philosophy, that being your individual self is somehow a betrayal to the “Black race”.

For those unfamiliar with the term, the Acting Black Crew believes that there is only one authentic way to be Black, and it’s neither life-affirming nor dignified. Sadly, they have adopted their sense of identity as African-Americans — and the cultural construct they are supposed to originate from — by watching slyly racist comedies, crime dramas and dramedies with one-dimensional, stereotypical, and (if female) FAT Black characters produced by Hollywood, for big profits and maintenance of the status quo. Any Black person who dares deviate from the stereotypes that the ABCs are comfortable with is deemed by them as “acting White”, “being bougie”, “selling out the race” etcetera.

( Note: The word “bougie” is intended to mean the same thing a bourgeois, but is an insult against Blacks who have the mettle to succeed professionally and otherwise.)

Now, if what constitutes “African American culture” is really nothing more than a group of people who have some African lineage banding together for the sake of preserving their similar skin tone, then yes, it can be argued that those who are lighter than acceptable levels (whatever that is) are outsiders, and those on the inside have every right to ban them. BUT when you have a real culture, one based on shared values, beliefs and traditions, no one — regardless of pigmentation — can diminish those values, beliefs and traditions by being born lighter (or darker) in complexion than the average person of said culture. Legitimate cultures bond those who share it.

I suspect that those who fear the “biracials” secretly fear that they have no real culture, and if, someday, there are fewer and fewer people around who look like them, they and/or their children will end up being socially and politically disenfranchised as a result.

One of the benefits of creating a real culture — a wholesome, life affirming and empowering culture that we can pass down to our children and their children (regardless of their melanin levels) — is the elimination of the fear created by the tenuous nature of a culture built on nothing more substantial than paper sack testing.

These are my views, my beliefs. What do you think?

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About blackfemaleculture

I am an African American woman looking to connect with other African American women who are interested in reinventing a wholesome, empowering culture that feeds the minds and souls of African American women and their children.
This entry was posted in IRR, Social Politics and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Why ‘Biracials’ Are Not the Enemy

  1. Faith Dow says:

    I think your point is valid, but missing critical points. We can still exact standards and call out historical slights without hating on anyone. I also find your use of African American confusing in comparison to other black ethnicities. Regardless, imo the very detailed and extensive conversations we held initially at Muslim Bushido (some content was removed for her book but the comments remain) delved into several angles worth reviewing.

    • “I think your point is valid, but missing critical points. We can still exact standards and call out historical slights without hating on anyone.”
      ~Faith Dow

      What critical points? Please name them. Do you believe that I am hating?

      “I also find your use of African American confusing in comparison to other black ethnicities.”
      ~Faith Dow

      Please explain. This is my first blog, and I am just getting started. But I have been on enough blogs over the past 2 years to know that many non-American Blacks do not want to be grouped together with American Blacks, and some resent being called “Black”, period, using their (or their parent’s)country of origin as a substitute for defining their ethnicity. It’s hard being PC.

      “Regardless, imo the very detailed and extensive conversations we held initially at Muslim Bushido (some content was removed for her book but the comments remain) delved into several angles worth reviewing.”
      ~Faith Dow

      I have not read that blog. I may look it up. Thank you for commenting.

  2. neurochick says:

    I just read your first post, YAY. Anyway, I agree with what you wrote. I am not biracial but many people think I am because of the way I look (complexion like Vanessa Williams/Paula Patton). I too was accused of not being “black enough” whatever that means. I have never understood what people mean by “acting black” or “acting white.” When you ask someone what they mean, they can never give you an answer. And if anybody had a problem with me dating someone who wasn’t black, I’d be like, “MYODB” and that would be it. The funny thing is that many of the same people who felt that way about me, now date non-black men.

    • You’re right. You can never get a straight answer out of such people. I suspect it’s because they are ashamed of what they really mean by “acting Black” because it NEVER means anything good, in my experience. That’s the major problem with what now passes for AA culture. It’s mostly negative, and makes normalcy taboo.

      “The funny thing is that many of the same people who felt that way about me, now date non-black men.”
      ~neurochick

      And if they have light-skinned children, they will probably say crazy ish to them too. I have come across a few of these types of BW who want to have a relationship with a non-BM, so that they can be happy, BUT do not want children, because it would “dilute the Black race”. Smh.

      • neurochick says:

        I see the opposite, a lot of these women talk out one side of their mouths saying they don’t want to “dilute the Black race” but on another side of their mouths say, “I want to marry a Black man with light skin and pretty eyes.” Hahaha.

  3. “I see the opposite, a lot of these women talk out one side of their mouths saying they don’t want to “dilute the Black race” but on another side of their mouths say, “I want to marry a Black man with light skin and pretty eyes.” Hahaha.”
    ~neurochick

    I think you’ll find that most of the African-Americans who say they want to “preserve Blackness” are completely color-struck, and the “Blackness” they wish to preserve is the ethnically mixed, light-skinned version that is only considered “Black” in the United States. Ironically, the Blackness Police rarely have any use for dark-skinned Black folks. This includes the dashiki and afro wearing African wannabees, who would never in a million years consider dating or marrying an unmixed African.

  4. KolorBlind Princess Temi says:

    I wrote a blog post about ‘biracials’ a few weeks ago.

    • Hello Princess Temi. I enjoyed reading your blog post “Black, White, Brown… Which Are You?” and I am now following your blog, but I removed the link to the post from your comment. When you comment in the future, I would prefer that you discuss the post at hand and not simply advertise your own blog. I do not want to open the door for others to do the same. Thank you for stopping by! I look forward to reading more of your posts.

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